share how by taking a quick survey!

Margaret Krome, public policy director at the Michael Fields Agricultural Institute, gave the Friday keynote at the Midwest Organic and Sustainable Education Services (MOSES) 23rd annual Organic Farming Conference on February 24.  In her session entitled “Growing Food, Health and Democracy,” Krome highlighted the importance of federal programs in maintaining and expanding sustainable agriculture.  She cited several examples of recent grassroots success, reminding us that we are the government:  if we aren’t satisfied, we need to hold it accountable. Krome noted:  “The government’s role is to provide support and encouragement to enterprises that optimize the interests of society, and that’s what we’re doing when we advocate funding for conservation programs that protect farmland and soil for future generations, rural development programs that help build farmers’ profits and create jobs, and opportunity programs that help new farmers enter agriculture.”

Part of holding government accountable is providing feedback on its programs.  Krome encouraged conference attendees to share via survey which federal programs have benefited them.  These stories are crucial to ensuing that valuable programs continue and grow, so please share your story if you have not already done so, (all are encouraged to take part:  you do not need to be a conference participant).

Thank you!

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At the intersection of food, soil, climate, farming and water.

Your story matters!

Written by Anna Meyer, Public Policy Intern
Michael Fields Agricultural Institute

Have federal programs helped your farm or business?  Please share how by taking a quick survey!

Margaret Krome, public policy director at the Michael Fields Agricultural Institute, gave the Friday keynote at the Midwest Organic and Sustainable Education Services (MOSES) 23rd annual Organic Farming Conference on February 24.  In her session entitled “Growing Food, Health and Democracy,” Krome highlighted the importance of federal programs in maintaining and expanding sustainable agriculture.  She cited several examples of recent grassroots success, reminding us that we are the government:  if we aren’t satisfied, we need to hold it accountable. Krome noted:  “The government’s role is to provide support and encouragement to enterprises that optimize the interests of society, and that’s what we’re doing when we advocate funding for conservation programs that protect farmland and soil for future generations, rural development programs that help build farmers’ profits and create jobs, and opportunity programs that help new farmers enter agriculture.”

Part of holding government accountable is providing feedback on its programs.  Krome encouraged conference attendees to share via survey which federal programs have benefited them.  These stories are crucial to ensuing that valuable programs continue and grow, so please share your story if you have not already done so, (all are encouraged to take part:  you do not need to be a conference participant).

Thank you!