NRCS Announces Sign-Up Deadline for Water Quality Initiative in Missouri

The USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) announced that landowners have until April 15 to request assistance through the National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI) to improve water quality in three Missouri watersheds.

State Conservationist J.R. Flores said that NRCS will provide financial and technical assistance to help farmers and ranchers in the three watersheds install conservation practices that manage nutrients, pathogens and sediments. 

The watersheds include: Upper Troublesome Creek (Knox and Lewis counties), Givins Branch – Niangua River (Webster and Dallas counties) and Basin Fork (Pettis and Johnson counties).

“We look forward to continuing NWQI efforts in Upper Troublesome Creek while beginning new work in Niangua River and Basin Fork watersheds.  Last year we completed projects in two watersheds and were fortunate to receive funding for two new sites in 2016.  The funding available to landowners will assist in providing measured reduction of nutrients and sediments in our state’s water sources.”

The goal of NWQI is to implement conservation practices in sufficient quantity within a concentrated area to minimize agriculture’s impact on the impairment of water bodies within these priority watersheds. NRCS and partners work with producers and landowners to implement voluntary conservation practices, such as nutrient management, cover crops, conservation cropping systems, filter strips, terraces and buffers, that improve water quality in high-priority watersheds while maintaining agricultural productivity. Water-quality-related conservation practices enhance agricultural profitability through reduced input and enhanced soil health, which results in higher soil organic matter, increased infiltration and water-holding capacity and nutrient cycling.

Flores said NRCS will work with landowners with approved applications to determine how alternative conservation systems being considered will improve water quality. Additionally, state water quality agencies and other partners will track water-quality improvements in the project watersheds.

NRCS accepts applications for financial assistance on a continuous basis, but applications for funding consideration during this fiscal year must be received by April 15.

For more information about NRCS’ programs, initiatives and services in Missouri, visit the programs page.

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MO Water Quality Initiative – Apply by April 15 with the NRCS

NRCS Announces Sign-Up Deadline for Water Quality Initiative in Missouri

The USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) announced that landowners have until April 15 to request assistance through the National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI) to improve water quality in three Missouri watersheds.

State Conservationist J.R. Flores said that NRCS will provide financial and technical assistance to help farmers and ranchers in the three watersheds install conservation practices that manage nutrients, pathogens and sediments. 

The watersheds include: Upper Troublesome Creek (Knox and Lewis counties), Givins Branch – Niangua River (Webster and Dallas counties) and Basin Fork (Pettis and Johnson counties).

“We look forward to continuing NWQI efforts in Upper Troublesome Creek while beginning new work in Niangua River and Basin Fork watersheds.  Last year we completed projects in two watersheds and were fortunate to receive funding for two new sites in 2016.  The funding available to landowners will assist in providing measured reduction of nutrients and sediments in our state’s water sources.”

The goal of NWQI is to implement conservation practices in sufficient quantity within a concentrated area to minimize agriculture’s impact on the impairment of water bodies within these priority watersheds. NRCS and partners work with producers and landowners to implement voluntary conservation practices, such as nutrient management, cover crops, conservation cropping systems, filter strips, terraces and buffers, that improve water quality in high-priority watersheds while maintaining agricultural productivity. Water-quality-related conservation practices enhance agricultural profitability through reduced input and enhanced soil health, which results in higher soil organic matter, increased infiltration and water-holding capacity and nutrient cycling.

Flores said NRCS will work with landowners with approved applications to determine how alternative conservation systems being considered will improve water quality. Additionally, state water quality agencies and other partners will track water-quality improvements in the project watersheds.

NRCS accepts applications for financial assistance on a continuous basis, but applications for funding consideration during this fiscal year must be received by April 15.

For more information about NRCS’ programs, initiatives and services in Missouri, visit the programs page.