by Megan Helt-Baldwin, Stella Gardens Intern

“You had me at scuffle.”

The title of this piece was going to be Scuffle Hoe: A Tool Review. But, I changed it because I can’t deny how enamored I am with this tool. Is is love. Like Romeo & Juliet, Mary Jane Watson & Peter Parker, John Tesh & Connie Sellecca. I have found my soul mate. My new favorite tool and I have a long row of eternal bliss to hoe.

What would make me go head over heels for a stick with a thingee that looks like a stirrup on the end? Hours and hours of weeding without one, that’s what. All of the sudden, in certain applications, I could scuffle up and down a row without ever getting dirty and in a speedy fashion. Deep ever lasting love cemented.

So, some folks call this kind of hoe a Dutch hoe, an action hoe, oscillating, swivel or Hula-Ho. Mine is a scuffle hoe because that is more fun to say. Scuffle Hoe and I love fun!Scuffle Hoe in action

The tool head of the hoe is a flat sharpened strap of metal that is pushed or pulled through the soil. O.K. Visualize with me:  Hold your hands out in front of yourself in the shape they would be in if you were holding a huge hamburger.  (That’s the metal loop!)  Now push your hands into a wall of whipped cream!  (That’s how easy it is to enter the soil and KILL YOUR ENEMIES!)  Slicing up weeds where they thought they were safe!  So great…

At two points in the Wikipedia article I read, the hoe triumphs over trowels and ploughs.  I like where their heads are at.  Get off your high horse. Plow!  The hoe predates you.  It was mentioned in Hammurabi’s Code.  That’s 18th century BC, dog!  Trowels, you’ve lost esteem with archeologists and now they’re choosing hoes to do their digging.  It’s saving spines everywhere ancient relics are found!

But do be careful.  Love can hurt.  “The human damage caused by long-term use of short-handled hoes, which require the user to bend over from the waist to reach the ground, and caused permanent, crippling lower back pain to farm workers.  This resulted in the California Supreme Court declaring the short-handled hoe to be an unsafe hand tool that was banned under California law.”  So, just make sure your how has a handle long enough to fit your height and you can get on with your deep meaningful relationship already!

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Scuffle Hoe: A Love Story

by Megan Helt-Baldwin, Stella Gardens Intern

“You had me at scuffle.”

The title of this piece was going to be Scuffle Hoe: A Tool Review. But, I changed it because I can’t deny how enamored I am with this tool. Is is love. Like Romeo & Juliet, Mary Jane Watson & Peter Parker, John Tesh & Connie Sellecca. I have found my soul mate. My new favorite tool and I have a long row of eternal bliss to hoe.

What would make me go head over heels for a stick with a thingee that looks like a stirrup on the end? Hours and hours of weeding without one, that’s what. All of the sudden, in certain applications, I could scuffle up and down a row without ever getting dirty and in a speedy fashion. Deep ever lasting love cemented.

So, some folks call this kind of hoe a Dutch hoe, an action hoe, oscillating, swivel or Hula-Ho. Mine is a scuffle hoe because that is more fun to say. Scuffle Hoe and I love fun!Scuffle Hoe in action

The tool head of the hoe is a flat sharpened strap of metal that is pushed or pulled through the soil. O.K. Visualize with me:  Hold your hands out in front of yourself in the shape they would be in if you were holding a huge hamburger.  (That’s the metal loop!)  Now push your hands into a wall of whipped cream!  (That’s how easy it is to enter the soil and KILL YOUR ENEMIES!)  Slicing up weeds where they thought they were safe!  So great…

At two points in the Wikipedia article I read, the hoe triumphs over trowels and ploughs.  I like where their heads are at.  Get off your high horse. Plow!  The hoe predates you.  It was mentioned in Hammurabi’s Code.  That’s 18th century BC, dog!  Trowels, you’ve lost esteem with archeologists and now they’re choosing hoes to do their digging.  It’s saving spines everywhere ancient relics are found!

But do be careful.  Love can hurt.  “The human damage caused by long-term use of short-handled hoes, which require the user to bend over from the waist to reach the ground, and caused permanent, crippling lower back pain to farm workers.  This resulted in the California Supreme Court declaring the short-handled hoe to be an unsafe hand tool that was banned under California law.”  So, just make sure your how has a handle long enough to fit your height and you can get on with your deep meaningful relationship already!